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Inspiration in Medieval Villages

Bear and I are home safe and sound from our wild and wonderful trip to the St. Ives Medieval Faire. We’re utterly knackered after the 27-hour round trip, but chock full of great memories made with old and new medieval friends.

It makes me smile to think back on all the great discussions held around campfires, huddled under tents out of the rain, and on straw bales outside the sanity-saving coffee vendor’s tent. There’s truly never a dull moment at medieval events, for each person you meet has a passion backed up by years of research and experimentation that leads to the most fascinating conversations.

I learned about medieval perfumery, Varangian leather armor, how to make soap from olive oil, what people ate for lunch in the 14th century, Templar religious practices, Odinism, Scottish herbalism, surgical practices in medieval times, and how to do Viking tablet weaving.

I loved strolling through the medieval encampments and market stalls, learning all about how rose petals and Grains of Paradise were used in the Middle East and what vegetables were grown and cooked with by the Vikings.

I couldn’t get enough of all the gorgeous handmade crafts, from hand-dyed wool and linen to carved wooden spoons. Aren’t the colors marvelous?

I’m always charmed by the naalbinding mittens, socks, and slippers. They look so cozy and warm, and the cheery colors and patterns are delightful.

Some of my favorite displays are the toys. The hand-carved wooden horses and tiny dolls made from scraps of wool and linen.

All this beauty and talent and history inspires me no end. As I sat on the bus coming home, my brain was whirring with things I want to research, make, and taste. Bear and I talked a mile a minute when we got in our car for the final leg of our journey, listing plans to enhance our own encampment, garb, and personas.

We want to finish the medieval bed Bear started a while back, complete my armor so I can start practicing medieval combat, and add the colorful Bedouin tassels I’ve been making to the Bedouin baby cradle, doorway to our tent, camel saddles, tent poles, and anything else that needs them.

It all makes me so happy and excited.

But first we need to settle back into normal life a bit. There is laundry to be done, dishes washed, bread made, animals fed, gardens watered, and errands run.

It’s so good to be home. xo

 




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Kathy McDonald - How fascinating. So glad you enjoyed it all

Krista - Thanks so much, @[email protected]_yFC0ih80l9:disqus 🙂 It was a really inspiring weekend. xo

Tracy A. - What a wonderful time! I just love all of the wool and colors!

Velva - Sounds like a wonderful few days! Medieval times is such a fascinating part of history. How did you get interested in attending faires and such? I think a blog post would be wonderful 🙂

Lizzy (Good Things) - Such fun and so interesting!!!

Krista - Thank you for the suggestion, Velva. 🙂 I will get to work on that straight away.

Krista - It surely was, Tracy A. 🙂

Krista - My thoughts precisely, @[email protected]:disqus 🙂

Cathy - Wow you went all that way Krista. Sounds like you had an excellent time. Boy do you have a lot of projects in the pipeline. I bet it does feel good to be home though 🙂

Krista - It was heaps of fun, @wanderingsheila:disqus I’m delighted to be home again, with a couple of weeks to prepare for our next event. 🙂

TheSurprisedGourmet - Sounds like it was a fascinating event, so much to see and learn. Love all the great photos.

Turkey's For Life - Enjoy getting back into normal life but looks like you had a great time, too, and learned lots of new things. And yes, those colours are just fabulous. Look forward to seeing the results of what you have been inspired by. 🙂
Julia

Jackie Smith - I love that fact that you take us with you on these wonderful adventures into the Medieval world. . .beautiful photos! Hugs, J.

Nancy - Did they have coffee in Medieval times?! I’m joking I promise. It all sounds so weird and wonderful – in a nice way I hasten to add. I love that there are people with passions like this who keep history alive – it’s brilliant.

Tandy Sinclair - I’m not sure I could have handled such a long bus ride, even for something as great as this looked 🙂

Ken Powell - If I’d known you were coming, Krista, I would have been there to greet you – less than 4 km away 😉

Krista - We didn’t handle it either, @tandysinclair:disqus, and have vowed never to do it again. 🙂 Next time we’re taking our car and taking two days for the trip traveling in daylight. 🙂

Krista - They sure did, @[email protected]_xRgkTDNCQJ:disqus, at least in our part of medieval times. We researched it well and were so very relieved to know that. 🙂

Krista - Ohhh, I wish I would’ve known that, @Kayrpea61:disqus for some reason I thought you were in Sydney itself. Humbug. Well, next year we will meet up for sure. 🙂

Krista - I’m so glad you don’t mind coming along, @[email protected]_WseMqaTPwi:disqus I know it’s not for everyone. 🙂 XO

Krista - I hope to start dyeing some fabrics and wool, @[email protected]:disqus 🙂

Krista - It was marvelously fun, @[email protected]:disqus

Nancy - That’ll teach me to be a smart arse 🙂

A Whole Lot of Medievalness » Rambling Tart - […] tentage, wooden boxes galore, and more tables and chairs than you can imagine. It’s a wild medieval hodgepodge, but I love seeing it all together as I tick things off my list and feel more prepared […]

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