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Autumn Blossoms and Turkish Hot Carrot Dip

How I love Autumn in Australia. Each morning I bundle up in sweater and socks, wrap a blanket tight around my legs and park myself in front of the heater. Within an hour or two I step outside into glorious sunshine and brilliant blue skies with air so warm I have to don a sundress or I get too hot.

Heavenly.

Last time I shared a few of the beauties to be found on our Australian goat farm in Autumn, and today I’ll share a few more.

I never cease to be amazed at the brilliant snippets of color to be found in what looks at first glance to be a sea of gold and brown.

Like these bright pink blossoms bobbing in the wind down by the pond.

Or these fabulous spiky, lime green pods dangling from long branches.

 

And these cheery little fuchsia blossoms nearly hidden among the long, golden grasses.

 

There are also the lovely things you expect to find in autumn: fallen leaves.

This green one caught my eye with dew drops glistening in the sunlight, and I liked the look of these rich brown ones caught on an old barbed wire fence.

Yesterday we had a marvelous time with several of our medieval friends from Black Wolf. The air rang with the clash of swords and the cheers of kids. I loved it. 🙂

We had a medieval feast on the back porch with all sorts of Turkish fare: garlicky flat bread and creamy yogurt dip, hot buttery hummus with toasted pine nuts, and a hot carrot dip with caraway, dill and paprika.

I’ll share the other Turkish recipes soon – but I promised two of my aunts that I’d post the carrot one immediately, so here goes. 🙂

What’s your favorite moment of your weekend?

Turkish Hot Carrot Dip

Ingredients:

10 carrots, peeled and sliced
1 Tbsp caraway seeds
2 Tbsp lemon juice
1/4 cup olive oil
2 Tbsp minced garlic
1 tsp paprika
2 Tbsp fresh dill, minced
salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup to 1/2 cup crispy fried onions

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Steam or boil carrots and caraway seeds until carrots are soft enough to mash with a fork.
  3. Drain and place in food processor (or blend by hand) and add all remaining ingredients except onions.
  4. Taste for seasoning, add more if you like it stronger.
  5. Pour carrot mixture into pie pan or earthenware pan. Top with crispy fried onions and bake 20-30 minutes until mixture is bubbling around the edges.
  6. Serve warm with slices of Turkish flat bread.

 




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Barbara - Your feast sounds tempting. The flat bread looks wonderful. And I must try this Carrot dip someday. We don’t have the New England colours for our autumn here in Astralia but the sun makes up for it.

Darlene - Thanks for the recipe, lovely lady 🙂 

Jacqueline - I’m still wrapping my brain around the fact that spring has only just begun over here, and you’re entering into autumn!?! But I do love the fact that we’re backwards now. The carrot dip is similar to something I learned to make not long ago, but I’ve never had it hot. That sounds like an extra dose of YUM.

Vandijk Susan - Yum! for the flatbread and carrot dip… your outside photos are lovely! Happy Autumn as we slip into Spring 🙂

Hila - oh yum, sounds delicious! And how cute are the cheery fuchsia blossoms?

Krista -  The sun MORE than makes up for it, Barbara. 🙂 I feel lucky every single day. 🙂 xo

Krista -  You’re so welcome, Darlene! I hope you like it. 🙂

Krista -  Thank you, Susan! Happy Spring to you! 🙂

Krista -  Isn’t it so crazy, Jacqueline? 🙂 I love it too, though. 🙂 I really liked it hot, but Bear informed me that he likes it better cold, so take your pick. 🙂

Krista -  Aren’t they darling, Hila? 🙂 They make me smile. 🙂

bellini - I can imagine the sweetness from the carrots in this dip. My favourite part of the weekend was getting my hands dirty in my little community garden. A few more weeks to wait for the wheat grass to work its magic and I will be planting my seeds.

Neil1964 - Beautiful little red/pink blossoms Krista.     I often feel a sense of contentment when I see the afternoon sun on the rustyred plum coloured native grasses on my afternoon walks. I can’t remember what season it was when I last saw that but I will be on the lookout from now on.  great recipe – gunna try that 1 – cheers

Kitchen Butterfly - I love autumn and this tart captures the warmth and comfort of all that fall has to offer. Love you loads….

Duchess - Oh wow! How badly do I want to try that dip???

Andi Perullo - Darling, these pictures are divine!!!!!! My favorite part of the weekend was family dinner on Sunday! 🙂

Krista -  It is beautifully sweet, Val, and the lemon sets it off beautifully. 🙂 How fun to get out in your garden!! 🙂

Krista -  Your grasses sound beautiful, Neil. I love that color. 🙂 Hope you like the dip! 🙂

Krista -  Love you dearly too, Ozoz!! Wish we could meet up for a cuppa. 🙂

Krista -  It is awfully good, Duchess, and so healthy. 🙂

Krista -  Oh how lovely, Andi. 🙂 Sunday family dinners are the best. 🙂

Joanne - Autumn in Australia looks gorgeous! So many beautiful, vibrant colors abound!

And this dip…amazing! I have some great bread I’d love to spread it on.

Breanne Mosher - I love the fact that you’re reveling in all that amazing autumn beauty and we’re just waking up to spring here in Canada. Those little beauties are breathtaking, I love the splash of color they give to the landscape.

As always, I found a breath of fresh air here. Thank-you. =) XO

Krista -  Mmm, good bread is essential for this dip, Joanne. 🙂

Krista -  It is delicious cold too, Lyndsey! Perfect for your hot weather. 🙂

Krista -  Thank you, dear Breanne! I’m so glad I could lift your spirits. 🙂 XO

Andrea and John - Mmmm – I’m going to have to try this one. Turkish food is delicious but I don’t think I’ve seen carrot dip before!

Deanna - I can’t say I’ve ever had a carrot based dip, but I’m definitely intrigued. I’ll have to try it. 

Angela - Gorgeous, I swear I’m never tired of staring at Mother Nature, and I’m so saddened when I see the damage we are doing to Her in the name of non better identified modernity.

Turkey's For Life - Mmmm, we’ve never seen the hot carrot dip in Turkey before but looking at the ingredients, I’m guessing it might be an Eastern Turkish dish. Must try it. It looks lovely. 
Julia

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